Zero Trust: What is it Really, and Why Should You Care?

The old saying goes, there are only two kinds of organizations: those that have been breached and those that will be soon. Clearly, the “moat-and-castle” approach to security has not worked. Simply being “inside” a network – behind a firewall, DMZ and other traditional defenses – does not confer trustworthiness, whether it’s a device, a user, network traffic, or an application.

What's Next for Election Security?

Election security is a big topic, but it resembles a many-legged centipede. Federal contractors face the reality that elections are the purview of state, county and municipal officials. The technical and managerial abilities of these entities vary from what you might expect in a tiny hamlet to what you might encounter in a million-person suburban county.

TIC 3.0: Great Work, but Not Zero Trust

DHS recently published version 3.0 of the Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) architecture. A response to changing IT conditions, Executive Orders, and OMB mandates, the new architecture seeks to support IT modernization through cloud adoption while keeping security as a top priority. The comprehensive set of documents includes an overview, a catalog of security capabilities, a reference architecture, guidance for pilot programs, advice for service providers, and a very helpful set of use cases relevant to agency needs.

Moving Target Defense: Beating the Hackers at Their Own Game

The Threat

Risk is a function of likelihood times impact.  When it comes to zero-day exploits, particularly those that use return-oriented programming (ROP) or one of its many cousins the likelihood is high, and the impact is higher.  How do these attacks work, and what is the industry doing to stop them?  More importantly, what can you do to stop them?  Is it possible to stop a zero-day without patching or updating systems?  Let’s explore these questions.

How ROP Works

Cyberspace Solarium Commission Report: Turning Thought to Action

The Cyberspace Solarium Commission recently released a groundbreaking report detailing 75 recommendations for improving the cybersecurity of the nation, including both the private and public sectors. The Commission, bipartisan in both name and spirit, conducted over 300 meetings with industry, academia, U.S. government, think tanks and foreign governments. I had the privilege of participating in this effort. The result is a comprehensive report that urges immediate and concrete action on its recommendations, organized into six pillars”:

Cybersecurity Has a Posse

At RSA this year, Chris Krebs gave an important talk: “Cybersecurity Has a Posse” where he stressed the importance of collaboration between government and industry to fight the cybersecurity war. He started by pointing out that his agency, Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is an “all-source” group. He meant that CISA collects threat information from sources all over the world, including government agencies, private industry, and more. Krebs’ group consolidates that information and disseminates it – daily – to security professionals across all industries.

Remote Working in the Time of COVID-19: These Steps Are Key to Cybersecurity

With the designation of the COVID-19 disease as a global pandemic hotly followed by a declaration of a national emergency by President Trump, the American way of life shifted dramatically – with the home office becoming a new reality for millions.

Unfortunately, the rise in the global remote workforce puts more pressure on IT teams, network architectures, and even equipment. But there are also very real cybersecurity challenges to consider.